The Anti-Infective Innovator Blog

Perspectives on Anti-Infective Drug Development

from Experts in the Trenches 

“Our mission at Spero is to bring novel, life improving therapies to patients suffering from infections, and there are key concepts that are unique to our field and the patients we serve. With the help of our team and key opinion leaders, we aim to amplify these topics for discussion with our collaborators within our field and in the biotech community.”    

     Ankit Mahadevia, M.D., Chief Executive Officer of Spero Therapeutics

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Recent Publications

De-Risking Antibiotic Drug Development with PK-PD

Antibiotic Drug Development:
Asking the Right Questions about Dose Selection Increases Probability of Clinical Success

March 26, 2018
By: Ankit Mahadevia, David Melnick, and Paul Ambrose

A recent analysis of drug development success rates from Phase I to approval found that the average infectious disease drug is 10 times more likely to succeed compared to the average oncology drug (a complementary analysis here–  different magnitude, same directionality).  Why?

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Billion Dollar Antibiotics in the Era of Stewardship:
It is Possible by Following 3 Guiding Principles

April 25, 2018
By: Cristina Larkin, David Melnick, and Keith A. Rodvold

Can billion-dollar antibiotics and stewardship co-exist? In an era where we are seeing increasing resistance to antibiotics it seems intuitive that there would be large market opportunity for new, effective antibiotics. However, peak year sales of recent launches haven’t lived up to expectations. What has led to the seeming bifurcation of commercial success and stewardship, and how do we fix it?

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Advancing Spero's Potentiator Platform

May 30, 2018
By: Ankit Mahadevia and Troy Lister

The CDC estimates that every year, at least 2 million people are infected with drug resistant bacteria and that the number of deaths resulting from these infections is equivalent to one fully loaded jumbo jet crashing each week. There are many contributors to these troubling statistics, with one being a lack of novelty in the way such infections are treated.

-- More Publications Coming Soon --